Op-Ed: Yes to Reparations for Slavery

November 18, 2020

Yes to Reparations for Slavery

The NAACP San Diego Branch supports and applauds Assemblywoman Weber’s proposal to create a commission to study reparations for the enslavement of more than 4 million Africans and their descendants from 1619 to 1865. As recognized by Weber’s bill, AB3121, the true costs of slavery and the systematic racism that followed, continues to reverberate throughout the Country, denying African Americans economic prosperity, educational opportunities and the full panoply of rights guaranteed under the U.S. and California Constitution. 

As recognized by the United States with victims of the Holocaust, Japanese internment camps and stolen lands of Native Americas, the United States has a moral and legal imperative to study not only how individual and corporate slaveowners wrongfully benefited from labor and lives of enslaved people, but to compensate for the economic and cultural damage caused by 400 years of systemic racism. These three historic examples of reparations can help us understand how to confront America’s “original sin.”

In 2000, the US government (Clinton) signed a treaty whereby Germany agreed to set aside 10 billion Deutsche marks to compensate all United States victims (including those who emigrated to the U.S.) of the Nazis. Both the German Government and German companies (most notably Deutsche Bank AG, Volkswagen, and BMW) contributed equally to a fund known as the “Remembrance, Responsibility, and the Future” Fund. Such treaty ended series of class action lawsuits known as the “In re Holocaust Victim Assets Litigation” to compensate Jews and non-Jews specifically for slave and forced labor they performed for German industry during the war. One of the lawsuits resulted in a $1.25 billion dollar settlement by Swiss Banks for victims of the Holocaust. Before the treaty was signed, President Bill Clinton established the “The Presidential Advisory Commission on Holocaust Assets in the United States,” to investigate U.S. assets acquired after 1933, and to determine whether any U.S. assets were originally the property of European Jews.

In 1988, the US government (Reagan) signed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 which provided $20,000 in reparations (tax free) to the surviving victims of the Japanese Internment Camps. This bill paid nearly 62,000 surviving victims. Before the passage of this law, the US Congress created a special commission to examine the issue of reparations and recommended that compensation be paid, concluding that the evacuation order, based on war hysteria and racial prejudice, violated Japanese families’ Constitutional rights. 

In 1946, the US government, passed the Indian Claims Act of 1946 to thank Native Americans for their military service in WWII. The US government created the “Indian Claims Commission” which allowed First Nation tribes to bring claims of reparations (such as takings of land) against the United States. By the time the commission was adjourned in 1978, the US Government awarded $818,172,606.64 in claims. 

Weber’s Bill recognizes centuries of injustice and its effect towards a distinct population of United States citizens. Creating a task force to study reparations is an important step that was taken both by Reagan and Clinton. The NAACP San Diego Branch will continue to support Dr. Weber’s efforts in Sacramento to heal our Nation.    

Legal Redress Committee
NAACP San Diego Branch

The Disparity Study Must Be Transparent

November 4, 2020

Mayor Kevin Faulconer
City Admin Building
11th Floor 202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Council President Gómez
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Cate
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Moreno
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Bry
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Kersey
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Sherman
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Campbell
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Montgomery
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Councilmember Ward
City Admin Building
10th Floor
202 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101

Dear Mayor and President and Members of the San Diego City Council,

We were pleased to meet with some of the team heading up the City’s Disparity Study last week.  We appreciated their experience, frankness, and eagerness for input.

Among the issues we raised today was our desire for the Study process to be transparent.  To that end, we request that the City share each and every draft of the study with the public as they are received, and not to wait until the formal public comment period to share results.

It was not so long ago that the City-funded Traffic-Stop Disparity study was heavily edited before publication, and many changes made that the community felt amounted to a City attempt to “spin” the study into a direction more favorable to the City.  Changes were even made to key study parameters that had a real effect on the quantitative outcomes of the study.

While we recognize that draft documents may contain errors, we strongly believe that to err on the side of transparency is the only way that the community will believe that justice is being done.

We, the NAACP San Diego Branch and the Urban League, pledge to work with the City to see that drafts are received in good faith, and to work with the City to correct any errors or misunderstandings that might occur.  We do NOT pledge to work with the City to do damage control if the City forces suspicious changes into the study BEFORE it is released to the public.

Please, in these times of difficulty and tension, trust is at an all-time low.  Showing exemplary transparency now is the best way to start repairing that trust.

Sincerely,

Francine Maxwell, President
NAACP San Diego Branch

Arts & Culture Funding

APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN FOR Organizational Support Program (OSP), Creative Communities San Diego (CCSD) AND Cares Grant Initiative (CGI)

Upcoming Workshops: Introduction to Arts and Culture Funding Opportunities hosted by Council Districts-

FY22 RFQ Workshops: OSP & CCSD– Join staff as we take a deep dive into the RFQ and guidelines. 

CARES Grant Initiative Workshop- Join staff as we take a deep dive into the application. Register by clicking on link below:

Office Hours SIGN UP– These 30 min meetings are meant to provide 1:1 support to help you apply.

Fiscal Sponsorship 101– Join if you’re a project producer or a fiscal sponsor and want to learn about applying for funding.

Access all application materials here: https://www.sandiego.gov/arts-culture/funding

Arts & Culture Funding

IT’S TIME TO APPLY!

FY22 Arts & Culture Funding Applications now available!

What funding opportunities are available?

  • Organizational Support Program (OSP): General operating support to arts and culture nonprofits
  • Creative Communities San Diego (CCSD): Arts and culture project support to any nonprofit (fiscal sponsors may be used for projects without a 501c3/501c6)

What’s new this year?

  • Match requirement reduced to 1:1!
  • More workshops!
  • Using a fiscal sponsor? We can help!

What do you need to know? 

RFQ Application Timeline: October 12, 2020 – November 13, 2020

Access all application materials here: https://www.sandiego.gov/arts-culture/funding

Resources to help you apply:

Upcoming Workshops: Introduction to Arts and Culture Funding Opportunities hosted by Council Districts

FY22 RFQ Workshops: OSP & CCSD– Join staff as we take a deep dive into the RFQ and guidelines. Register by clicking on links below:

Office HoursSIGN UP– These 30 min meetings are meant to provide 1:1 support to help you apply.

Fiscal Sponsorship 101– Join if you’re a project producer or a fiscal sponsor and want to learn about applying for funding.

Check out our website to find resources to apply including technical assistance materials and more: https://www.sandiego.gov/arts-culture/funding

HABLAMOS ESPANOL! Porfavor contacte a Karla si necesita ayuda en español: [email protected]

Let’s take a moment to discuss how we got here…2020 has been a year like no other. And here you are, applying for funding for 2021/2022 when you may not even know when you can open your doors or if you can produce your festival. We’re here to help. We’ve lowered the match requirement to help you with cash-flow. We’ve increased our technical assistance and we’re eager to work with you, one-on-one. Did you know, you can work with a fiscal sponsor if you don’t have a 501c3/501c6 ? You can! Attend our Fiscal Sponsorship 101 workshop where we will cover how to apply with a fiscal sponsor. And, if you are a 501C3/ 501c6 and want to become a fiscal sponsor, we invite you to join the workshop as well! We are available to provide support in Spanish throughout every step of the process. Si necesita ayuda en español, estamos disponibles para apoyarlos en cada paso del proceso.
 Let’s make 2021 and 2022 the best it can be. We’re here to help!

Arts & Culture Funding for BIPOC Communities

SPECIAL COUNTYWIDE FUNDING
OPPORTUNITY FOR
ARTS & CULTURE ORGANIZATIONS SERVING
BIPOC COMMUNITIES

In response to the onslaught of COVID-19 and its disproportionate impact on communities of color, one-time emergency general operating support is available to arts and culture organizations serving Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) communities. Preference will be given to eligible organizations that intentionally serve BIPOC communities and didn’t receive support through the City’s fiscal year 2021 Organization Support Program or Creative Communities San Diego funding categories.

What do you need to know?

We look forward to working with you!

CGI is a one-time special grant initiative in response to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic funded by Federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act money awarded to the California Arts Council (CAC) through the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency, and allocated to their State-Local Partners, including the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture