Dr Martin Luther King, Jr Parade

Dr Martin Luther King, Jr giving his “I Have a Dream” speech.

Final Updates!

T-Shirts are Here!

The t-shirts are here. If you ordered a t-shirt, we have it for you. If you didn’t order a t-shirt, you can still pick one up in most common sizes. T-shirts cost $15. You may purchase one at the parade, or you may purchase one from 2-3pm on Saturday, January 19th at the NAACP Office, Room 388 of the Joe and Vi Jacobs Center at 404 Euclid Avenue.

Find Us by the Fountain

The parade sets up between noon and 2pm on Harbor Drive between the County Administration Building (1600 Pacific Highway) and the Embarcadero. We will gather at 1pm by the circular fountain on the bay (Harbor Drive) side of the County Administration building:

Please arrive by 1pm to be sure to have time to find us before the parade begins. Consider taking the trolley to the County Administration Building to avoid parking problems.

About the Parade

Read what the organizers, the Zeta Sigma Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. have to say about the parade:

Join us on Harbor Drive Monday, January 21, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. for the 39th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Parade. This is one of the largest celebrations of its kind in the United States in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. The parade is filled with dazzling floats, phenomenal High School Bands, Drill Teams, College, Fraternities & Sororities, Churches, Peace and Youth organizations.


This parade is coordinated by the Zeta Sigma Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., the oldest African American fraternity in America, founded in 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Dr. King was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha.


Come join thousands as we continue the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, January 21, at 2:00 p.m.

ACT-SO Builds Robots with lilStar

ACT-SO enabled six students to join lilStar’s BUILD Robots day.   This was a fun day for the kids, who got to build actual autonomous robots from kits generously provided by Clarity Design, in a lab at the University of San Diego.  Sponsorship was also provided by Beta Selam Academy.  The instructor for the day was Camille Eddy.

Chow Down and College Up: ACT-SO Visits the HBCU Expo

There is an HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) Expo happening at the Jacobs Center on January 19th, from 2-6pm.  Join the ACT-SO crew for (free) lunch, then head on over to the Expo and see what these historic educational institutions have to offer.

We are having lunch from Burros & Fries from 12-2pm in Room 389.  Don’t worry if you don’t have a ticket, we have plenty of food.

ACT-SO Visits Black Xpression!

The ACT-SO crew when to visit Black Xpression!, the Friday night performance event featuring open mic performances by African-Americans.  Then of us went, including a member of the committee, one of our judges, several students and their parents.

We look forward to many more ACT-SO outings in the coming months, include a movie night, a tour of the Salk Institute, a lecture/demonstration on neuroscience, and much more.

ACT-SO is the NAACP’s Afro-Academic, Scientific, Technological and Scientific Olympics for African-American high school students.  If you have talent and want to show it off, sign up with us today!  Or, if you would like to see African-American students succeed, sign up to help out.

NAACP San Diego Freedom Fund Dinner 2018

“Our Voices, Our Engagement, Our Votes Matter!” was the theme of our annual Freedom Fund Dinner on October 12, 2018 at the Kona Kai Resort & Spa.  Dr. Helen Griffith, Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer of e3 Civic High served as the Mistress of Ceremonies. Consistent with the theme of the dinner, Dr.  Andre´ Branch, president of the San Diego NAACP reminded all those gathered of the critical importance of voting on November 6, 2018.

There were outstanding performances by saxophonist Erisa Nicole, pianist Gloria Daviston and drummers of Extreme Rahim Entertainment.  Jor’Denay Collier, San Diego ACT-SO gold medalist, performed her award winning poem, “Mr.  Drugdealer.”  The 9th and 10th Cavalry Association, San Diego Chapter Buffalo Soldiers, led the presentation of colors ceremony.

The San Diego NAACP honored four students for their outstanding academic accomplishments.  The students were Yosief Abraham (Hoover High School), Amy Amoah (Eastlake High School), Jor’Denay Collier (Eastlake High School), and Angel Rios (Lincoln High School).

Dr. Branch presented a President’s Award to California Attorney General Xavier Becerra for his service and leadership.  Attorney General Becerra has decades of experience serving the people of California through appointed and elected office, where he has fought for working families, the vitality of the Social Security and Medicare programs and issues to combat poverty among the working poor.

The San Diego NAACP honored three individuals for their community service.  Eugene “Mitch” Mitchell, Vice President, State Governmental Affairs and External Affairs for San Diego Gas & Electric and Southern California Gas Company is an active member of the community.  He currently serves on the board of directors of the San Diego Museum of Art, the Voice of San Diego and the California Asian Chamber of Commerce.  Rebecca Paida is the Senior Program Manager for Nile Sisters Development Initiative.  The mission of that organization is to educate, support and offer training to refugee and immigrant women and their families to help them overcome barriers to social and economic self-reliance.  Ms. Paida is a former refugee who is intimately aware of the health disparities as well as the social and economic challenges people face when relocating to a new community.  Eric Rivera, Vice President for Student Affairs at San Diego State University has dedicated his life to advancing access, student success and achievement for all students in higher education.  Under his leadership the division significantly expanded learning communities and student support centers such as the Black Resource Center, Commuter Resource Center and the Women’s Resource Center.

The San Diego NAACP honored four organizations for their community service.  The California Innocence Project (CIP) is a law school clinic, founded in 1999 at California Western School of Law, dedicated to freeing the innocent, training law students and changing laws and policies in the state of California.  Since its inception, CIP has freed 30 people from prison who have served more than 340 years in prison for crimes they did not commit.  The San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild provides a forum for the continuation of the tradition of quilting as an art and a method of recording history and storytelling.  They donate baby quilts to military families.  They donate quilts to community members who are ill.  Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc., Mu Sigma Zeta Chapter provides scholarships to youth in the San Diego community.   Its signature event held in April is “Zeta to a Tea, Military Women Rock!”  The event honors women who have or are serving our country in the military.  Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc., Omicron Iota Sigma Chapter serves the community though activities that include providing scholarships, contributing to organized charities and promoting voter education and voter registration.

The San Diego NAACP holds its general membership meetings on the first Thursday of each month at 6:00 pm in the Community Room of the Jacobs Center located at 404 Euclid Avenue, San Diego.  The meetings are open to the public.

Here are photographs of attendees and honorees and performances from the dinner:

The Union Tribune covered the dinner:

San Diego NAACP honors service at Freedom Fund Dinner

The San Diego NAACP held its Freedom Fund gala dinner.

And this was the event program:

NAACP 2018 Booklet 10.5.18

Our Sponsors

October 19th ACT-SO Visit to Black Xpression

ACT-SO will be visiting the dynamic Open Mic night that is Black Xpression.  If you register (for free), ACT-SO will cover your entrance fee.

If you wear your ACT-SO t-shirt (which we will be happy to give students for free if they signup to compete), we will give you a $5 coupon toward food and drink!

For more information about Black Xpression, visit facebook.com/IWillXpress/.

2018 Freedom Fund Dinner Adds Two Honorees

The San Diego NAACP is pleased to announce two additional individuals to be honored at the Freedom Fund Dinner on October 12, 2018:

– The Honorable Xavier Becerra, Calfornia Attorney General

– Eric Rivera, Vice President for Student Affairs at San Diego State University.

On January 24, 2017, Xavier Becerra was sworn in as the 33rd Attorney General of the State of California, and is the first Latino to hold the office in the history of the state.

The State’s chief law enforcement officer, Attorney General Becerra has decades of experience serving the people of California through appointed and elected office, where he has fought for working families, the vitality of the Social Security and Medicare programs and issues to combat poverty among the working poor. He has also championed the state’s economy by promoting and addressing issues impacting job generating industries such as health care, clean energy, technology, and entertainment.

Attorney General Becerra previously served 12 terms in Congress as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. While in Congress, Attorney General Becerra was the first Latino to serve as a member of the powerful Committee on Ways And Means, served as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, and was Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security.

Prior to serving in Congress, Attorney General Becerra served one term in the California Legislature as the representative of the 59th Assembly District in Los Angeles County. He is a former Deputy Attorney General with the California Department of Justice. The Attorney General began his legal career in 1984 working in a legal services office representing the mentally ill.

Born in Sacramento, California, Attorney General Becerra is the son of working-class parents and was the first in his family to receive a four-year degree, earning his Bachelor of Arts in Economics from Stanford University. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Stanford Law School. His mother was born in Jalisco, Mexico and immigrated to the United States after marrying his father. He is married to Dr. Carolina Reyes, and they are the proud parents of three daughters: Clarisa, Olivia and Natalia.

For nearly three decades, Eric Rivera has dedicated his life to advancing access, student success and achievement for all students in higher education. Mr. Rivera’s career in higher education spanned four institutions across the country and two of the largest state university systems in the nation (California State University and State University of New York). For the last 22 years, he served the community of San Diego through his work at San Diego State University (SDSU), most currently as their Vice President for Student Affairs.

Born and raised in the Bronx in New York City to immigrant parents who did not speak English, Mr. Rivera was the first in his family to go away and graduate from college. As a first-generation college student, he experienced firsthand the complexity and challenges of navigating college, facing obstacles his peers didn’t experience. This experience formed the foundation of his motivation to ensuring all students have the capital when entering college, and the importance of aligning campus resources with student access and student success strategies.

As Vice President for Student Affairs at SDSU, Mr. Rivera is responsible for the strategic planning and analysis of the division and has direct oversight for administering the division’s $60-million budget. Under his leadership, the division of Student Affairs significantly expanded learning communities and student support centers – such as the Black Resource Center, Commuter Resource Center, the Pride Center, Women’s Resource Center, and the Undocumented Resource Area. Mr. Rivera built the nationally recognized Aztec Parents Program which connects families to the university through meaningful programs, and established SDSU as a national leader in parent programs, alongside Stanford University and University of California, Berkeley, according to publications like the Los Angeles Times.

During Mr. Rivera’s time at SDSU, the university has grown from a regional university into one that is nationally recognized for its mission of access; academic and research excellence; and global focus. Mr. Rivera has played important roles in developing transformational educational opportunities, enhancing and expanding the campus’s physical landscape, and leveraging SDSU’s rich diversity to maximize the personal and academic success of all students. These efforts contributed to raising retention and graduation rates for all students while nearly eliminating achievement gaps among ethnic and racial groups. The university was recognized by The Education Trust as one of only 26 universities in the country that have increased graduation rates for all students while nearly eliminating achievement gaps among ethnic and racial groups.

At SDSU, while the overall graduation rate is 75.3%, African American students are graduating at 72.0%; Latino students at 72.5%; and low-income first-generation students in the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) are graduating at 71.1%. Most recently, SDSU was named a Top 100 degree producer by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, ranking No. 17th, recognizing the institution’s strengths in supporting and graduating minority students. The Top 100 report is the only national report on the awarding of degrees to African American, Asian American, Hispanic and Native American students at U.S. universities and colleges.

Mr. Rivera’s professional affiliations include National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), Council for the Advancement & Support of Education (CASE), Association for the Study of Higher Education, and Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities (ASHE & HACU). He served on NASPA’s Latino Knowledge Community Advisory Board and Minority Undergraduate Fellows Program Advisory Board.

In addition to his professional associations, Mr. Rivera is very active in the community. He was a member of the San Diego Community College Trustee’s Advisory Board and the City of San Diego Otay Mesa Planning Group. Mr. Rivera was appointed by the Mayor and City Council to the San Diego Convention Center Corporation Board of Directors from 2002 through 2006; and the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Education Committee during 2003-2004. He also currently sits on the San Diego Gas and Electric Advisory Board.

Mr. Rivera was honored with an SDSU Presidential Top 25 Award in 2007 and again in 2010. He was the recipient of an Abrazo award in 2010. He was also the recipient of the NASPA Latino Knowledge Community’s Outstanding Senior Student Affairs Officer Award in March 2007.

Watch: ACT-SO at Casa del Rey Moro

ACT-SO invited participants and friends to join a tour of Casa del Rey Moro, a museum dedicated to the history of African peoples.  After the tour, we had pizza and snacks in the park in the center of Historic Old Town San Diego.  Here’s a little taste of what we did:

Military Appreciation Luncheon

Tickets now being sold for the NAACP San Diego Armed Services & Veterans Affairs Committee’s Military Appreciation Luncheon.  Come show our service members that you honor them for the sacrifices they make and the difficult and dangerous work they do to keep us all safe!

You may purchase individual tickets, or sponsor an entire table for your friends and loved ones; or sponsor a table and let us fill it with deserving members of our Nation’s Armed Forces!

10 November is the Marine Corp birthday.  As you know, our Military Appreciation Luncheon was scheduled for 10 November 2018.  Because many of the active duty military and veterans that we wanted to honor will be attending the various Marine Corp Balls, we are postponing our Military Appreciation Luncheon to 18 May 2019.  Those of you who have purchased tickets should rest assured that your reservation for the luncheon is secure.