News about our events

May 12: Crusade for Justice-The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells

Members’ Book Club Book of the Month:

The May book club book is Crusade for Justice-The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells by Ida B. Wells-one of the founders of the NAACP.

“No student of black history should overlook Crusade for Justice.”—William M. Tuttle, Jr., Journal of American History

Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was one of the foremost crusaders against black oppression. This engaging memoir tells of her private life as a mother of a growing family as well as her public activities as a teacher, lecturer, and journalist in her fight against attitudes and laws oppressing blacks.

Please join us! We will meet, via Zoom for now, once per month to talk and share our feelings about books we’ve read selected by our members. Everyone will have the opportunity to nominate books for future meetings.

We are meeting at 7pm on the 2nd Wednesday of each month. Criteria for book nominations includes anything related to the African-American experience and any books written by black authors regardless of topics.  To join, just send an email request to [email protected]

We look forward to reading with you!

Community Health and Resource Fair

BECOME A MEMBER!

Do you support our work?  Join the team, and let’s get to work together!

Community Health and Resource Fair

SDBPOA Townhall

BECOME A MEMBER!

Do you support our work?  Join the team, and let’s get to work together!

SDBPOA Townhall

Zoom Requirements

For the safety of all attendees, we require the following from participants in our meetings:

  • Have a (paid or) free Zoom account and log in to it before attending
  • Use a current recognizable photo of their face as the profile picture
  • Use their legal first and last names on their profile

For help on setting up zoom, please see sandiegonaacp.org/zoom-setup

At 6pm on April 21st, you may join the discussion by clicking below:

Or, if you just want to watch, you can visit:

April 14th Book Club: Black Political Organizations in the Post Civil Rights Era

Members’ Book Club Book of the Month:

The April book club book is Black Political Organizations in the Post-Civil Rights Era by Ollie Johnson and Karin Stanford.

We know a great deal about civil rights organizations during the 1960s, but relatively little about black political organizations since that decade. Questions of focus, accountability, structure, and relevance have surrounded these groups since the modern Civil Rights Movement ended in 1968. Political scientists Ollie A. Johnson III and Karin L. Stanford have assembled a group of scholars who examine the leadership, membership, structure, goals, ideology, activities, accountability, and impact of contemporary black political organizations and their leaders. Questions considered are: How have these organizations adapted to the changing sociopolitical and economic environment? What ideological shifts, if any, have occurred within each one? What issues are considered important to black political groups and what strategies are used to implement their agendas? The contributors also investigate how these organizations have adapted to changes within the black community and American society as a whole.

Please join us! We will meet, via Zoom for now, once per month to talk and share our feelings about books we’ve read selected by our members. Everyone will have the opportunity to nominate books for future meetings.

We are meeting at 7pm on the 2nd Wednesday of each month. Criteria for book nominations includes anything related to the African-American experience and any books written by black authors regardless of topics.  To join, just send an email request to [email protected]

We look forward to reading with you!

Watch: March 10th Jury Townhall

At 6pm on March 10, we had a discussion regarding service on juries.

A “jury of your peers” cannot happen without a diverse jury pool. We had a lively discussion with Superior Court Judge Dwayne K. Moring, Deputy District Attorney Dwain Woodley and Deputy Public Defender Euketa Oliver on how to ensure justice for all!

Judge Dwayne Moring

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed Dwayne K. Moring to a judicial seat on the San Diego County Superior Court on July 21, 2008. 

Judge Moring currently hears criminal matters as the Supervising Judge at the San Diego South County Courthouse. He is the first African-American Supervising Judge for the South County Courthouse.  His previous assignment was in one of the old Central Courthouse Felony Settlement Departments where half of all the felony cases filed at the main courthouse were heard in his department.  He was also assigned to the Juvenile Delinquency Court for three years.

Judge Moring tried approximately 75 felony and misdemeanor jury trials prior to his appointment.  He has presided over approximately 50 jury trials as a judge. 

Prior to his appointment, Judge Moring was a Deputy District Attorney in the Sex Crimes and Stalking Division of the San Diego District Attorney’s Office.  Previously, Judge Moring was a Deputy Alternate Public Defender with the San Diego Alternate Public Defender’s Office, and a Deputy City Attorney in the San Diego City Attorney’s Office.

Judge Moring is a board member of the San Diego Judges Association, a Sustaining Member of the San Diego Lawyers Club, a lifetime member of both the Earl B. Gilliam Bar Association and Earl B. Gilliam Bar Foundation, and a Master with the J. Clifford Wallace American Inn of Court.  He currently sits on the Board of Directors of the: California Judges Association, Crawford High School Academy of Law, Pepperdine Caruso School of Law, and the University Club Atop Symphony Towers of San Diego.  He is also a member of the San Diego Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.

Judge Moring is the recipient of several awards for his involvement in the legal community.  In October 2017 he was recognized by Pepperdine University as one of its “Top 40 Over 40 Alumni.”  He was honored with the “Flame Of Inspiration Award” by the Thomas Jefferson School Of Law Black Law Student Association in March 2008 acknowledging his mentorship of minority law students.  In 2007, Judge Moring received the “Outstanding Service By A Public Attorney Award” from the San Diego County Bar Association.  He also received the San Diego County Sexual Assault Response Team’s “Response With A Heart Award” in appreciation of his significant contribution to sexual assault prosecution in 2007.

Judge Moring received his juris doctor degree from Pepperdine School of Law in 1991.  He also attended Pepperdine University as an undergraduate where he received a Bachelor’s degree in journalism in 1984.  

 Judge Moring was born and raised in San Diego, California.

Dwain Woodley

Dwain Woodley was appointed to Chief Deputy District Attorney at the San Diego District Attorney’s office by District Attorney Summer Stephan in 2018.  Chief Woodley, a 31 year attorney and Navy Jag Corps veteran,  earned his B.A. from McDaniel College 1986 and earned his J.D. the University of Maryland Law School in 1989. 

As a Navy Jag Woodley gained experience as a defense attorney and later joined the Office of the Public Defender of San Diego County where he represented indigent clients.  In 2001 he joined the office of the District Attorney of San Diego County where he led  Superior Court Division, Juvenile and South Bay Divisions. 

Chief Deputy Woodley was raised in Baltimore Maryland in a family that instilled the importance of public service.  He recognizes that the community must have trust in the fairness of the judicial system for it to work effectively and that having prosecutors from diverse backgrounds provides an extra level of confidence that the system is fair to its citizens.  Chief Woodley also understands that community safety is more than incarceration.  The judicial system as a whole should have a greater purpose – to prevent crime and to create a peaceful, law-abiding society. 

 

Euketa Oliver

Euketa Oliver is a Deputy Public Defender with the San Diego County Office of the Primary Public Defender.  For over 15 years, her practice has focused on representing indigent individuals in their criminal and appellate matters. For the past 3 years, Euketa has worked in the Writs and Appeals Unit, where she is responsible for providing legal advice to approximately 200 attorneys, office-wide trainings on new laws and legislation, as well as conducting extensive legal research and writing. As a Deputy Public Defender, Euketa has handled over 70 jury trials. She has argued appellate matters before the Fourth District Court of Appeal, Division One and the San Diego Superior Court Appellate Division. Prior to her legal career, Euketa obtained a Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology. Euketa is Immediate Past President of the Earl B. Gilliam Bar Foundation; co-chair of Lawyers Club of San Diego, Diverse Women’s Committee; serves on the San Diego Superior Court’s Anti-Bias Legal Equality (ABLE) committee, and member of the San Diego County Bar Association’s Bench-Bar Committee. 

Working Together to Improve Outcomes for all Black Children and Families

A two-Part Symposium

Sincerest Gratitude

On behalf of the NAACP San Diego Branch & SDSU’s Black Minds Project, I would like to personally extend our gratitude to each and every phenomenal panelist and participant. Thank you for making our symposium on Working Together to Improve Outcomes for All Black Children and Families a heartfelt success.

Here is Day One’s recording:

Day One: Why Black Educators Matter

Speakers:

  • Dr. J. Luke Wood, San Diego State University, Distinguished Professor of Education
  • Dr. Adisa Alkebulan, SDSU, Associate Professor and Chair of Africana Studies (invited)
  • Dr. Micia Mosely, Founder and Director of the Black Teacher Project
  • Lisa Kelly, Middle School Teacher, Black Teacher Project Fellow
  • Dr. Ernest Black, Statewide Director of the CalStateTEACH Program
  • Dr. Joe Fulcher, Assistant Superintendent, Equity, Culture & Support Services, Sweetwater Union High School District

Moderator: Katrina Hasan Hamilton

Here is Day Two’s recording:

Day Two: Why Support is Critical for Increasing Black Parent Involvement in Schools

  • Dr. Grace Carroll – Wordsmith LLC, Akira’s Book Club & The Village Project’s Emanyatta Program
  • Dr. Idara Essien – SDSU, Assistant Professor Child and Family Development
  • Selam Gebrekristos, M.F.T. – SDSU, Co-Director of MA in Education with a concentration in Counseling. SDCC, Counselor
  • Rashida Hameed – President/CEO of Epiphany Women in Focus, Epiphany Project
  • Mohamed Qas – SDSU, The Black Minds Project

Feb 27: ACT-SO Writer’s Workshop

ACT-SO Writer’s Workshop: Poetry & Black History

All are welcome to join us at 2pm on February 22nd to work on writing poetry. Examples of great poems from Black writers of the ages will be used to inspire and instruct writers of all ages.

At the time of the workshop, anyone may join by visiting:

Zoom Requirements

For the safety of all attendees, we require the following from participants in our meetings:

  • Have a (paid or) free Zoom account and log in to it before attending
  • Use a current recognizable photo of their face as the profile picture
  • Use their legal first and last names on their profile

For help on setting up zoom, please see sandiegonaacp.org/zoom-setup

March 10: The Water Dancer

Members’ Book Club Book of the Month:

The March book club book is The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • From the National Book Award–winning author of Between the World and Me, a boldly conjured debut novel about a magical gift, a devastating loss, and an underground war for freedom.

NOMINATED FOR THE NAACP IMAGE AWARD • NAMED ONE OF PASTE’S BEST NOVELS OF THE DECADE • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Time • NPR • The Washington Post • Chicago Tribune • Vanity Fair • Esquire • Good Housekeeping • Paste • Town & Country • The New York Public Library • Kirkus Reviews • Library Journal

Young Hiram Walker was born into bondage. When his mother was sold away, Hiram was robbed of all memory of her—but was gifted with a mysterious power. Years later, when Hiram almost drowns in a river, that same power saves his life. This brush with death births an urgency in Hiram and a daring scheme: to escape from the only home he’s ever known.

Please join us! We will meet, via Zoom for now, once per month to talk and share our feelings about books we’ve read selected by our members. Everyone will have the opportunity to nominate books for future meetings.

We are meeting at 7pm on the 2nd Wednesday of each month. Criteria for book nominations includes anything related to the African-American experience and any books written by black authors regardless of topics.  To join, just send an email request to [email protected]

We look forward to reading with you!

Jan 26: ACT-SO Mentor Orientation

Join us at 7pm on January 26th for an introduction to mentoring high school kids in our ACT-SO Program.

In this orientation, we’ll explain briefly how the ACT-SO program works, cover the requirements, responsibilities, and rewards of mentoring African-American high school students, and answer your questions. This event is for folks who are already signed up and/or who are just interested.

To learn more about the program, visit our home page: sandiegonaacp.org/actso

To sign up to volunteer (mentor, judge, committee member, etc), visit sandiegonaacp.org/actso-volunteer

At the time of the event, join via sandiegonaacp.org/actso-zoom

Zoom Requirements

For the safety of all attendees, we require the following from participants in our meetings:

  • Have a (paid or) free Zoom account and log in to it before attending
  • Use a current recognizable photo of their face as the profile picture
  • Use their legal first and last names on their profile

For help on setting up zoom, please see sandiegonaacp.org/zoom-setup

At the time of the orientation, anyone can join by visiting:

Home Page

Watch: Eviction Townhall

2021 01 22 NAACP San Diego Branch Eviction Townhall

Longstanding racial inequities in the housing market, along with widening income disparity and the economic meltdown caused by COVID-19 have made many or our…

At 2pm on Friday, January 22nd we had an informative evening regarding information on fighting evictions in your community.

Longstanding racial inequities in the housing market, along with widening income disparity and the economic meltdown caused by COVID-19 have made many or our friends and neighbors wondering if they’ll be evicted.

State and Federal eviction moratoriums are set to expire soon, and when all that back rent is suddenly due, many people will be at risk of losing their homes.

Meanwhile, local, State and Federal agencies are looking at extending and improving protections for renters and compensating small landlords.

We heard from agencies on the front line of this crisis about how you can help your community avoid evictions. We found out about where to go for what kind of help, and where to find the latest information about changes in the law.