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Attendance Needed: SDHC Lawsuit Hearing

As you know, the NAACP San Diego Branch is involved in a lawsuit to fight the San Diego Housing Commission’s discriminatory and segregationist practice of setting Section 8 voucher levels too low to allow access to all areas of our city.

Low-income folks are a positive asset to a neighborhood when that neighborhood is doing well. They become part of the community, they participate in life, and their labor and presence helps the community thrive. It’s when low-income folks are forced to live all in one place that there is trouble; when nobody has much money, there’s no way for that neighborhood to thrive.

If we build a truly fair housing system, that lets low-income folks live throughout our city, they will do better and all our neighborhoods will do better.

There will be a hearing on August 30 at 10:30 a.m. in Department 66 at 330 W. Broadway (the Hall of Justice), to determine whether or not the SDHC will be required to let us look at their records so we can see fully into how they have behaved. Your support would be very much appreciated at this hearing!


We are very grateful to those of you who came out for our Press Conference; it got the media interested. Make no mistake; regardless of attorneys or judges or laws or motions or rulings, public opinion MATTERS. If YOU show up and YOU show you CARE about what they’re doing to low-income people and the neighborhoods the SDHC forces them to live in, our local government WILL take notice!

Photo: Robert Tambuzzi

NAACP San Diego Joins Lawsuit Against San Diego Housing Commission’s Racial Segregation Policies – Voice and Viewpoint

Coverage from ABC 10

Coverage from NBC 7

Children Don’t Belong on Prison Buses

Really, San Diego City Parks & Rec and County Sheriff?

Do we really have to say this?  Children don’t belong on prison buses.  Children don’t belong in environments meant to cage and hold adults.  It is entirely inappropriate for any children at any time for any reason.

How much worse, then, that these children were largely children of color from underserved communities.  These children have grown up in economically distressed, segregated communities. One reason these communities are economically distressed is the predatory policing practiced against African-Americans and other people of color.  This predatory policing has been described as the “school-to-prison pipeline.” The idea that the Sheriff and the City would deliberately load black and brown schoolchildren onto a prison bus is beyond endurance.

It adds insult to injury that other vehicles have been used for other children; why is it the black and brown who are loaded onto prison buses?

We would have applauded the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department for sponsoring a beach trip for underserved youth.  We would have applauded the City of San Diego Parks and Recreation Department for organizing the trip. Instead, these two organizations have demonstrated their inability to understand (or perhaps their callous disregard of) the difficulties faced by the poor and the brown in the City of San Diego.  

The NAACP San Diego Branch is in its 100th year of supporting Civil Rights and fighting discrimination.  We would be delighted to help educate Sheriff Bill Gore and his Department, as well as Mayor Kevin Faulconer and his Parks and Recreation Department.  These thoughtless and insensitive actions do real harm to our children and our communities, and they must stop.

Press Conference and Rally: End SDHC Section 8 Discrimination

San-Diego-Section-8-Map-1

The above map shows how the SDHC forces Section 8 voucher holders into neighborhoods where people of color have been concentrated for a century.


After being sued by NAACP and San Diego Tenant Union for the racially discriminatory manner in which San Diego Housing Commission administers its housing voucher program, the Housing Commission received a 14 percent increase in funding for this program–$20 million annually–due to fair market rents going up. However, instead of keeping up with fair market rent, the Housing Commission instead made the gap even larger between what a voucher is worth and how much it actually costs to rent a home.

The disparity between what it costs to rent a unit and what the Housing Commission sets as a voucher level is especially pronounced in high-income, predominantly white neighborhoods. The Housing Commission intentionally sets voucher levels to more closely match market rents in low-income, racially segregated neighborhoods.

The actions SDHC took on July 1, 2019, denies housing opportunities to low-income families with Section 8 vouchers, and perpetuates racial segregation.

The lawsuit plaintiffs (the NAACP San Diego Branch, the San Diego Tenant Union, and Darlisa McDowell) and their counsel (Parisa Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Esq., Bryan Pease, Esq., and Jim Crosby, Esq.) will hold a press conference outside the next Housing Commission meeting:

Where: Sidewalk outside of SDHC, 1122 Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101
When: 10 a.m. Thursday, July 18, 2019

The disparity between the voucher level and what the Housing Commission sets as a voucher level is especially pronounced in high-income, predominantly white neighborhoods. The Housing Commission intentionally sets voucher levels to more closely match market rents in low-income, racially segregated neighborhoods.

The actions SDHC took on July 1, 2019, denies housing opportunities to low-income families with Section 8 vouchers, and perpetuates racial segregation. 

The lawsuit plaintiffs (the NAACP San Diego Branch, the San Diego Tenant Union and Darlisa McDowell) and their counsel (Parisa Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Esq and Bryan Pease, Esq) will hold a press conference outside the next Housing Commission meeting:

Where: Sidewalk outside of SDHC, 1122 Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101
When: 10 a.m. Thursday, July 18, 2019

The 4th of July, 400 Years Later

The United States has not been celebrating July 4th for 400 years. That’s how long most Africans in America trace our plight on this continent. Not all, but most. By the time the wealthy, white, landholding Continental Congress-men signed the Declaration of Independence, Africans had already endured 157 years (or more) of enslavement by the British colonizers. The august men who signed the revered document proclaiming “life and liberty” as God-given rights of all (men), decided it was okay for Africans and their descendants to endure another 89 July Fourths in slavery, in the “land of the free”, until it no longer served the political and economic interests of the northern states, whose industrial development gave them the advantage in the Civil War.

Since then we have seen forward and backward motion in fits and spurts regarding white America’s attitude toward the people of African descent. After Reconstruction, legal battles, World Wars and the Civil Rights Era; white power, white supremacy and white privilege have always clawed back some of the gains African descendants have made – as if we have ever made gains enough to serve as reparations for what was stolen from our ancestors and is now subsumed within the wealth of America and (mostly white) Americans.

After 400 years the Bible tells us God got tired of it all and had a plan for the sudden and dramatic liberation of an oppressed people in an ancient land. The most powerful nation on Earth suffered a crippling defeat without ever fighting a battle. It was primarily because of a recalcitrant and egotistical leader who would not listen to anyone’s counsel. One can only hope history will repeat itself, and my people will be free in short order, by divine order.

C.M. Honoré, President
NAACP San Diego Branch